Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

November 23, 2014

Injuries in sports are going to happen. There is nothing we can do to change them. We can simply work to prevent as many of them as we can while reducing the life-long effects of injury when they do occur. Unfortunately some injuries are catastrophic and may even lead to death. Additionally, catastrophic injuries can be the result of a missed symptom of a general medical condition. In this paper, the author will attempt to enlighten readers to a series of conditions known most frequently as sudden cardiac death. A specific emphasis will be placed on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) however sudden cardiac death and the controversy that surrounds the entire climate of testing and participation shall be examined.

To read the full paper, please click SuddenCardiacDeath.

What Does #AT4ALL Mean?

November 13, 2014

Simple question, but is there is a simple answer? Occasionally I get asked this question. What does #AT4ALL mean? To so many people, it can mean so many different things. I recently asked this question on Twitter and as of this writing, I only had one reply. And her reply was different than mine. Her reply was on a more global picture than my definition.
Read the rest of this entry »

Patient First

November 3, 2014

Healthcare providers often get mixed up in many different priorities when it comes to their jobs. We must remember to always put the patient first. They are the reason we are here. They must always be Priority #1. Do what is best for your patient. The rest will take care of itself.

 

Every Athlete Deserves an Athletic Trainer. #AT4ALL 

There has been so much press about many different helmet sensors coming onto the market. Or computer testing such as ImPACT. While these tools can be great, they still cannot detect concussions. They can provide great data and it’s data we should use. But humans still must detect and diagnose concussions. This is why the value of having a Certified Athletic Trainer is so great. Do your kids a favor; make sure they are protected by a Certified Athletic Trainer.

Every Athlete Deserves an Athletic Trainer #AT4ALL

Hello There From Texas

September 14, 2014

Hello there from Texas! I know I haven’t written for a little while, but let me update you on where I’m at now and what is new for me. July 29th I received a phone call that would change my life. I accepted a new position at the Head Athletic Trainer for Bishop Lynch High School in Dallas, TX. In the matter of 6 days, I accepted a new job, resigned from my previous position, moved from Waterloo, IL to Dallas, TX and started my new job. Read the rest of this entry »

One aspect of the athletic trainers’ job is to manage emergency situations on the field. We preach having an emergency action plan and knowing who is going to do what when that unfortunate emergency does happen. But for teams, coaches, and the medical professionals, it is important that we not only consider the EAP for our home games. Read the rest of this entry »

Heat Related Illnesses

July 9, 2014

I encourage all of you involved in football (and soccer and cross country) to take advantage of the time to become better educated in the recognition and treatment of heat illnesses. According to the Korey Stringer Institute, approximately 80% of heat deaths in athletics will occur in July and August. I believe Dr. Casa said that in the five year period ending in 2014, there have been/will be 23 heat-related fatalities in athletics. These are nearly 100% preventable. Let’s not add to these stats this year…

Korey Stringer Institute at the UConn

http://ksi.uconn.edu

Video Produced by KSI and Cabot Public Schools out of Arkansas

IHSA Heat Brochure

http://www.ihsa.org/documents/fb/Pol…chure%20MQ.pdf

Cheerleading Injuries

July 7, 2014

Cheerleading injuries are on the rise. For this reason, it is important that administrators, parents, coaches, and medical personnel recognize that cheerleaders must received appropriate medical attention just like any other athlete.

Shields and Smith noted that from 1990-2003 cheerleading saw an increase in participation from 3.04 million to 3.58 million while also seeing a 110% increase in injuries. Cheerleaders suffer many different injuries including sprains and strains, but can also suffer broken bones and even more serious injuries. Approximately 65% of catastrophic injuries in female high school athletics have been attributed to cheerleading. Why is that? Read the rest of this entry »

A couple of weeks ago, Dr. David Geier asked me my thoughts after the American Medical Association declared cheerleading a sport. Here is my full answer to his question…

 

Is cheerleading a sport? Ask me that 5 years ago and I probably would have laughed in your face. Today, however, I have a much greater respect for cheerleading. Personally I would agree with the roughly 30 state associations who now consider it a sport however that designation is not clear in all cases nor shall we construe that the designation as a sport provides specific safety requirements as proposed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Read the rest of this entry »

Dr. David Geier posed this question to me last week. The American Medical Association has decided to take the stance that cheerleading should in fact be considered a sport. As you’ll see reading Dr. Geier’s article, this stance is very similar to that of the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2012. So, what was my answer?

Check out his article… http://www.drdavidgeier.com/cheeleading-sport-ama/

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