Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

November 23, 2014

Injuries in sports are going to happen. There is nothing we can do to change them. We can simply work to prevent as many of them as we can while reducing the life-long effects of injury when they do occur. Unfortunately some injuries are catastrophic and may even lead to death. Additionally, catastrophic injuries can be the result of a missed symptom of a general medical condition. In this paper, the author will attempt to enlighten readers to a series of conditions known most frequently as sudden cardiac death. A specific emphasis will be placed on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) however sudden cardiac death and the controversy that surrounds the entire climate of testing and participation shall be examined.

To read the full paper, please click SuddenCardiacDeath.

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Over the course of the last 9 months, I have spent significant time researching two topics: Cheerleading injuries and the Functional Movement Screen (FMS). This has culminated in my Capstone Project with the above title. Today I’m pleased to share with you my project. I would certainly be remiss if I did not thank the cheerleaders at Waterloo High School and their coach Amber Hensiek, my mentors Ashley Rockey and Dr. Carlen Mulholland, and the program director at the University of South Florida Dr. Rebecca Lopez. Without all of their help, this project would not have been possible. Please feel free to leave any comments or questions you may have and I’ll try to answer them to the best of my ability!

 

Injury prevention is a mainstay in the athletic training profession and something that we attempt to achieve on a daily basis. Identifying exactly why and how the injury rates can be improved must be a priority. National injury surveillance programs have been developed that help researchers to track these injury rates if that sport is included in the particular interests of the study.

Cheerleading has long fought to be recognized as a sport, which caused it to be excluded from national sports injury surveillance programs for many years. Additionally, rules and regulations have long lagged behind the sport itself in terms of safety. There are national associations such as the National Cheer Safety Foundation and the National Cheer Association who have attempted to improve the safety of the sport, but much work remains. Cheerleading is no longer the cheerleading mothers and grandmothers grew up with girls on the sideline leading the cheers of victory. Instead, the sport has become a competitive activity with similarities to gymnastics combined with team spirit1. Many cheerleaders were at one time gymnasts and these girls have brought those skills and experiences to the cheerleading competition mat. Competitive cheer and gymnastics share many risks and rewards. One of these risks is the increased opportunity for serious injury. Absent serious injury, cheerleading also causes numerous less severe injuries such as sprains and strains on a regular basis. It has been noted that while cheerleaders do not suffer injuries at the same rate as other athletes, the percentage of catastrophic injury is much higher than other female sports at the high school level1,2.

If you want to read the whole thing, you can download the paper FinalDraftCapstone.

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And athletic training sends me on another adventure. This time Tampa, FL for a week of learning. I believe that makes 8 states I’ve been to involved in athletic training. This week I spent my days sitting in class with 9 classmates through the University of South Florida’s Masters in Medical Sciences program. We had some very impressive names come talk to us and I definitely believe it has been a very valuable week for me! I will write several blogs that will discuss the various topics and activities during the week.

Day 2 of class was started with Dr. Micki Cuppett. Dr. Cuppett was one of our professors during the spring semester and is the former program director for USF’s undergraduate athletic training program (ATEP). She has recently taken on the role of Executive Director for the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Read the rest of this entry »

And athletic training sends me on another adventure. This time Tampa, FL for a week of learning. I believe that makes 8 states I’ve been due involved in athletic training. This week I spent my days sitting in class with 9 classmates through the University of South Florida’s Masters in Medical Sciences program. We had some very impressive names come talk to us and I definitely believe it has been a very valuable week for me! I will write several blogs that will discuss the various topics and activities during the week.

 

Sunday morning was an early morning for me. I’m used to sleeping in that day of the week! But we headed for Lambert Airport at 6AM. As it was early on a Sunday morning, the airport was not real busy so I was able to get through security relatively quickly and had about 90 minutes to kill before my flight. It made a great time to get some reading done for class! Read the rest of this entry »

Last year during National Athletic Training Month, I discussed the National Athletic Trainers’ Association’s plan to evaluate a potential name change. You can read that post here.

This year I am enrolled through the University of South Florida as a graduate student and last week our discussion was about this very topic. I’d like to talk a little bit about that discussion as well as introduce a new year on the blog during National Athletic Training Month.

So What’s In a Name?

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The Bull Run: Introduction

August 20, 2012

In a few short weeks, I will be beginning my masters degree through the University of South Florida. As many of you already know, I am quite excited and cannot wait to get started! This new series is one I hope to keep up with over the next 5 semesters as I progress through my classes. Here we go! Go Bulls!

This first post in the series will be rather short. Details are still coming in and I will begin preparing accordingly as I am given more details. I have my email, BlackBoard, etc all set up. I now have all three of my textbooks for this semester in my posession, and now I wait to pay my bill! My last book came in the mail today.

I can’t wait! Go Bulls!

Many people talk about starting school whether it’s your kid’s first day of kindergarten or first day of high school, or a kid’s first day of college. Regardless, there is the anticipation and build-up to that and lots of emotions involved as well. And I’m experiencing that right now. I’ve mentioned before that I’m starting graduate school in September and really September cannot come soon enough! I made my decision way back in April. I will be pursuing my Masters in Medical Sciences: Athletic Training Concentration through the University of South Florida. Read the rest of this entry »

The NATA says that over 70% of all athletic trainers have a masters degree or higher. Since a bachelor’s degree is all that is required to become a certified athletic trainer and practice as an athletic trainer, I think it bodes well for the profession when so many professionals have decided to continue their education and achieve advanced degrees. Those degrees could range anywhere from masters degrees in physical education to administration to degrees in physical therapy or physician assistant studies. Regardless, it is increased education and the profession is better for it. Read the rest of this entry »

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