So many times over the last few weeks I’ve posted emergency and urgent reasons why high schools and youth teams needed Certified Athletic Trainers. But what must be understood is that Athletic Trainers do much more than just game coverage. Athletic Trainers are responsible for the evaluation of injuries, but also prevention of injuries. I’ve said it before and I truly mean it: I would rather spend 10 hours doing preventative work to prevent injury than 1 hour of rehabilitation after an injury. Prevention of injury does not simply mean taping ankles and wrists. But evaluating movement and making changes to movement patterns. Creating strength and conditioning programs which could very well prevent an ACL rupture. Evaluating the field surface, ensuring water and Gatorade are available during practices and working with the coaches in extreme heat to prevent heat illness. There are so many things that Athletic Trainers do to PREVENT injuries instead of having to deal with the aftermath later… #AT4ALL #NATM2014

Kettlebells for back pain? Neurosurgeon thinks so! And I agree here. In the last 12 months, I’ve taught a “Senior Kettlebells” class which I’m sure many of them have dealt with this or that pain before, during, and after class. But I’ve been told by a few of my class participants that they’ve quit taking pain medicine, quit needing cholesterol medications, and been able to do things around the house that they couldn’t do as easily before. Kettlebells truly do have a place in many rehabilitation programs.

Movement Quote

January 27, 2013

“Do what people need, not what they want”–Gray Cook

I found this video on YouTube and although it’s a couple of years old, I think it is important for us to be thinking about and understand. ACL injuries in female athletes have a large presence in high school and youth sports. Check out this video… Read the rest of this entry »

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