So many times over the last few weeks I’ve posted emergency and urgent reasons why high schools and youth teams needed Certified Athletic Trainers. But what must be understood is that Athletic Trainers do much more than just game coverage. Athletic Trainers are responsible for the evaluation of injuries, but also prevention of injuries. I’ve said it before and I truly mean it: I would rather spend 10 hours doing preventative work to prevent injury than 1 hour of rehabilitation after an injury. Prevention of injury does not simply mean taping ankles and wrists. But evaluating movement and making changes to movement patterns. Creating strength and conditioning programs which could very well prevent an ACL rupture. Evaluating the field surface, ensuring water and Gatorade are available during practices and working with the coaches in extreme heat to prevent heat illness. There are so many things that Athletic Trainers do to PREVENT injuries instead of having to deal with the aftermath later… #AT4ALL #NATM2014

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This type of story right here is the motivation for what I do each day. Beth Mallon‘s life may have been drastically changed if the coach would have been responsible for “checking on” Tommy. But the team had a Certified Athletic Trainer. She likely saved Tommy’s life that day. And I understand what she’s saying in the video about realizing that she was holding his head (and his life) in her hands. Unfortunately I’ve been there in similar situations. Each day we go to work not to save a life, but to help our patients/athletes perform to the best of their ability. Sometimes our work requires we perform life-saving actions. All we can do is prepare ourselves emotionally, psychologically, and mentally for those situations. That is why it is so important that every school employ a Certified Athletic Trainer. #AT4ALL Every Athlete Deserves an Athletic Trainer.

 

Athletic Trainers are skilled healthcare providers who are often able to determine severity of injury. They can determine the need for emergent or urgent care or if an injury can wait. Parents should be asking if their son or daughter’s school has a Certified Athletic Trainer. If not, the question should be: Why not? #AT4ALL

We know severe injuries happen on the battle field so we put combat medics in the field to treat those injuries. We know horrific crashes occur in NASCAR so we put EMTs and firefighters inside of the track. We know injuries happen in youth sports… so we say “go see your doctor in 2-3 days.” Yep… It all makes sense to me! #AT4ALL

Over the next few weeks, I will be sharing some papers that I’ve written in graduate school. None of these shall be considered “peer-reviewed” but hopefully they are beneficial for readers. Please leave any kind of feedback! Remember, we’re all here to learn so definitely share any thoughts.

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) is a condition in the hip theorized to be a potential precursor to osteoarthritis in the joint [7]. Its relative recent discovery and correlation leaves much to be desired at this time. It was not until the early 2000’s that this group of bony deformities were correlated appropriately within the orthopedic community. For this reason, there is much to learn as the medical community moves forward. FAI is categorized in three different fashions. First is a cam lesion which is associated with an abnormality on the femoral neck or head, second a pincer lesion is over-coverage of the acetabular rim, while the last category includes both of the previous deformities.

 

Read the rest of the paper here: FAIMikeHopperFall2012

And athletic training sends me on another adventure. This time Tampa, FL for a week of learning. I believe that makes 8 states I’ve been to involved in athletic training. This week I spent my days sitting in class with 9 classmates through the University of South Florida’s Masters in Medical Sciences program. We had some very impressive names come talk to us and I definitely believe it has been a very valuable week for me! I will write several blogs that will discuss the various topics and activities during the week.

Day 2 of class was started with Dr. Micki Cuppett. Dr. Cuppett was one of our professors during the spring semester and is the former program director for USF’s undergraduate athletic training program (ATEP). She has recently taken on the role of Executive Director for the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Read the rest of this entry »

And athletic training sends me on another adventure. This time Tampa, FL for a week of learning. I believe that makes 8 states I’ve been due involved in athletic training. This week I spent my days sitting in class with 9 classmates through the University of South Florida’s Masters in Medical Sciences program. We had some very impressive names come talk to us and I definitely believe it has been a very valuable week for me! I will write several blogs that will discuss the various topics and activities during the week.

 

Sunday morning was an early morning for me. I’m used to sleeping in that day of the week! But we headed for Lambert Airport at 6AM. As it was early on a Sunday morning, the airport was not real busy so I was able to get through security relatively quickly and had about 90 minutes to kill before my flight. It made a great time to get some reading done for class! Read the rest of this entry »

This is probably an exam we see often in athletic training or physical therapy. It’s something we as athletic trainers and those in the physical therapy world and fitness world must also be prepared to address. It’s time we “think outside the box” and look beyond the pain site.

Let me set up the patient for you:

  • She is an adolescent volleyball player who plays high school volleyball 4 months and club volleyball the other 8 months of the year. Very little rest time in her sports schedule. Read the rest of this entry »

Cheerleading continues to increase in numbers, and consequently injuries are also on the rise. The injury rate of cheerleading is relatively low, however it does account for around 2/3 of catastrophic injuries in female high school athletes. It is thought that the increase of cheerleading injuries is related to the transition the activity has made from being on the sidelines of football and basketball games into a competitive activity of its own. In just a 13 year period, cheerleading increased in numbers from 600,000 in 1990 to over 3million participants in 2003! Read the rest of this entry »

  1. Concussion education and concussion management must begin as early as collision sports begin.
  2. A major factor in orthopedic injury is previous injury.
  3. Emergencies occur at the youth level too!
  4. Proper warm up and cool down are important in the prevention of injury. Read the rest of this entry »
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